Samuel R. Throckmorton

Samuel Reading Throckmorton (1809 -1883), c. 1833. He came to San Francisco in 1850 as an agent for a mining company and later became the administrator of Richardson's estate. When he fell into debt, Throckmorton was granted most of Rancho Saucelito in payment. Throckmorton also suffered financial setbacks and after his death it was sold to the Tamalpais Land & Water Co.

Creator: unknown

Publisher: Lucretia Hanson Little History Room, Mill Valley Public Library

Date: Circa 1833

Rights: Physical rights of the images in this collection are retained by the Mill Valley Public Library, Lucretia Little History Room, or are protected by copyright. Use of this image requires permission from the Mill Valley Public Library, Lucretia Little History Room.

Samuel R. Throckmorton

Samuel Reading Throckmorton (1809 -1883), c. 1833. He came to San Francisco in 1850 as an agent for a mining company and later became the administrator of Richardson's estate. When he fell into debt, Throckmorton was granted most of Rancho Saucelito in payment. Throckmorton also suffered financial setbacks and after his death it was sold to the Tamalpais Land & Water Co.

Creator: unknown

Publisher: Lucretia Hanson Little History Room, Mill Valley Public Library

Date: Circa 1833

Rights: Physical rights of the images in this collection are retained by the Mill Valley Public Library, Lucretia Little History Room, or are protected by copyright. Use of this image requires permission from the Mill Valley Public Library, Lucretia Little History Room.

Samuel Throckmorton's "The Homestead"

Samuel Throckmorton's "The Homestead"

Samuel Throckmorton's “The Homestead"

In 1838, the Mexican government awarded William Antonio Richardson the Rancho Saucelito land grant of 19,000 acres. Subsequently Rancho Saucelito was acquired by Samuel Throckmorton who, in approximately 1866, built a lodge, “The Homestead,” on the Rancho at what is now the corner of Ethel Avenue and Montford Avenue.

Throckmorton lived in San Francisco, and would bring friends to his ranch to hunt elk and bear. Throckmorton and his friends they stayed in one half of  "The Homestead," while the ranch manager, Jacob Gardner, lived in the other half.

The ranch was originally William Antonio Richardson's open cattle range. Throckmorton started leasing all of his avalible acreage for dairy ranches to tenants from Portugal's Azores Islands. In 1868, he hired Jacob Gardner, a bachelor, as ranch manager. It was a tough job overseeing the Azorean Portuguese tenants, managing a large cattle ranch, and maintaining 15 miles of fencing with several gates. There was also the farming at The Homestead and readying horses for Throckmorton and his hunting buddies. 

Throckmorton viewed Rancho Sausalito as his playground. He was jealous of it and would allow no trespassers or campers. One visitor wrote, "It was quite a privilege to obtain a special permit to spend a day at the ranch. You drove up from Sausalito in a livery conveyance to The Homestead, presented your permit and procured a key to the gate at Locust that would allow you to picnic at the Old Mill." 

In 1873, Jacob Gardner left for greener pastures, but returned as ranch manager in 1880 with a wife and family in tow. Gardner stayed on after Throckmorton's death and ownership of the ranch had passed to the Tamalpais Land & Water Co. 

In 1900, "The Homestead" was destroyed by fire.